Why Should I Cry For You - Sting - The Soul Cages (Vinyl, LP, Album) download full album zip cd mp3 vinyl flac

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RockWhy Should I Cry For You - Sting - The Soul Cages (Vinyl, classical. Deutsche Grammophon. StingRob Mathes [1]. If on a Winter's Night The journey back to where I came from. The idea of death. Lines about this father thing kept coming up.

Something was saying I had to deal with it. But I have to of course, and it serves a purpose. Even though death isn't much of a party subject it's valuable to me to think about it. I figured that I'd have to go through some sort of process where I would get this stuff out.

Once I'd worked that out, I realised that I was going to have to write a record about death. I didn't really want to. I don't think the 'Soul Cages' is going to conform to any of their expectations - I think they're expecting a record about ecology or something. If they're surprised, then I'm pleased. And the next record will hopefully surprise them again.

I enjoy that music, and I like making it, but it didn't seem to apply. So the bulk of the record is based on Celtic folk melodies. I'd written a lot of little fragments of music, but there were no real ideas coming out.

I was genuinely frightened. At one point I thought, "This is it, I've just dried up! Perhaps I was afraid of what might come out if I wrote something.

I think there was an awful lot of denial and blockage going on in my subconscious - there Album) things I wasn't ready to face. This went on until after I'd gotten a band together and had two months before the whole process [of rehearsing and recording] was supposed to begin. I still didn't have a damn word. I spoke to Bruce Springsteen about it. He was just starting his own album, and I said, "Bruce, I don't know what to do.

Have you got any bad songs you don't want" He offered me a couple. Then one day I just sat at the piano and started to free associate, mumbling to myself there was nobody in the house - and the mumbling got louder and gradually I started to sing lines.

Words started to flow out 'Island of Souls' was one of the first. So I wrote down what I thought were just disconnected images and lines. Quite a few were about the sea, and all were linked somehow to my father and his death. Suddenly, I realised I was mourning my father, and then the whole thing poured out of me like a river - which became the central image on 'All This Time'.

That album was very personal, confessional, and therapeutic in terms of facing death and loss. But I guess you could say the therapy worked, because now I have a new sense of freedom, a desire to move on and make songs solely intended as entertainments, designed to amuse.

Liner Notes Sting explains There seemed to be a certain amount of anxiety regarding this new piece of work. To be honest, at the time I had very little to show in the way of material. In fact, since the recording of ' Nothing Like The Sun', inI hadn't written as much as a rhyming couplet, much less a whole song. I was suffering from what they call 'writer's block' It wasn't any fun at all. I signed up Hugh Padgham to produce and hoped that a deadline and a couple of contracts would jump start the proceedings.

No shortage of melodies, chord structures, harmonic themes, intros, middle eights, codas, cadenzas and contrapuntal calypsoes. But not one line of a lyric - nothing I walked from one arid beach to the next. My deadline, like an ominous tidal wave, was getting closer and closer and was about to swamp me. A few people I cared about were abruptly taken off the planet, plus the usual mid-life sort of stuff. No, we're going to have to look much further back than that. Let's take that long road back to the beginning of things.

The river flowed to the sea Review from Q magazine by Peter Kane Some words of warning to all would-be millionaire rock stars: the job isn't always what it's cracked up to be. Whether you're the man of the people Phil Collins type, a hermetically sealed George Michael or another ageing juvenile Rod Stewart LP the making, there comes a time when you have to stop trying to make it in films, put an end to scouring the globe in search of painless diversion or using your name to sway public opinion and get back to making records.

Sometimes it even hurts; especially if you used to be called Gordon Sumner, came from sound blue collar stock and have trouble reconciling your natural, decent, liberal instincts with the excessive rewards of your chosen career.

It's been a good three years since ' Nothing Like The Sun' and 'The Soul Cages' accompanying press release, penned tellingly by the man himself, ranks much of the writer's block suffered during that fallow period when he still managed to take on the guise of Great White Protector Of The Rain Forests.

His muse must have been merely puffing her feet up, though, for he's gouged out of himself another most Sting-like affair: a panoramic sweep of the soul that is fastidiously mounted, overtly literate and, against the odds even occasionally quite moving, not least on the fragile closing ballad 'When The Angels Fall' or 'Why Should I Cry For You's' elegantly simple melody set against a looping Third World beat.

Water is everywhere, whether looking out across the river and beyond on Album) deceptively bouncy 'All This Time' or going under for good in 'The Wild Wild Sea' which as a tune, manages to exhibit distinct latter-day sea shanty possibilities. Even the title track, which comes complete with nagging rock guitar motif seems to warn of an eternal watery damnation a full five fathoms below the surface, so much so that it's hard not to put all this down to his "going native" in the Amazon and a greening belief that salvation lies only in the return to a more natural order.

Few would argue with that or even the grim Biblical forebodings of 'Jeremiah Blues Part 1 ', one of those jazzy funk items with a bit of Why Should I Cry For You - Sting - The Soul Cages (Vinyl piano-tinkling thrown in that he often favours. In the face of such gushing humanity, the slender Latinate instrumental, 'St Agnes And The Burning Train', comes as a welcome breather.

As one who has built himself virtually from scratch, Sting has proved a master of artifice as well as one of rock's more articulate practitioners. He's not unaware of the ambiguous reaction that his caring, sharing, all-purpose, adult-branded music tends to provoke, nor is he likely to be oblivious to the fact that, in the Why Should I Cry For You - Sting - The Soul Cages (Vinyl spirit of the times, sensitivity sells, especially when it's as carefully packaged as this.

Still, let's face it, there are worse things to be accused of. Review from Rolling Stone magazine by Paul Evans Something of a pop culture superman, Sting can seem like a daunting - and perhaps overly self conscious - model of higher evolution. A hitmaker erudite enough to quote Prokofiev, a studiously literate lyricist equally fond of venturing into the mists of Jungian psychology and citing such sly ironists as Nabokov, and a millionaire who's fastidiously politically correct, Sting is a rock star of a complexity that never could have been imagined by such raw geniuses as Little Richard.

A tireless media crusader for the Brazilian rain forest and a more credible actor than most rockers-as-actors, he's also a proud father and the lurky possessor of looks sharp enough to qualify him as a fashion-mag cover boy. The Renaissance man on hyperdrive, he gulps challenge with every breath he takes. Highly serious and sonically gorgeous, 'The Soul Cages' is Sting's most ambitious record yet - and maybe his best.

Like 'The Dream of the Blue Turtles', fromand ' Nothing Like the Sun', fromit forgoes Police-style catchiness and the safety of conventional song structure for vast swirls of sound that build to either musical or emotional crescendo; the nine pieces are minidramas of intensity and will.

What elevates Sting's new music is its freer, deeper and more unified mood. If Sting's deliberate smarts open him up to charges of being an artist who too obviously thinks while he dances, 'The Soul Cages' may trash that perception. It's his most moving performance. It's also a difficult one. Dense with images of dead fathers and trapped sons, of bitter weather, of moonlight and oceans that threaten oblivion or tempt with release, the songs seldom waver from a deep fatalism that, no matter how romantic its guise, is almost unbearably tense.

The long-standing sidemen of Sting's solo career, saxophonist Branford Marsalis and keyboardist Kenny Kirkland, undergird a crew of players who seem to relish the test of the intricate, longish material. Drummer Manu Katche provides complicated, sometimes free, sometimes tight propulsion, and Marsalis remains Sting's ace ally, insinuating graceful, nearly Arabic melodies. Sting's bass playing is supple throughout, and his voice - startling, ever since the Police's 'Roxanne' - has gained subtlety.

It's now a truly expressive instrument, whether slurring in a sort of artful Scottish burr or clear-throatedly declaiming. At times recalling the highly textured moodiness of such hip classical movie composers as Angelo Badalamenti 'Twin Peaks' and Ennio Morricone 'The Mission' and any number of spaghetti-western masterpiecesthe music has a cinematic breadth.

It helps that the sounds are so enticing. They pull the listener into verbal landscapes that, for all their lush description, are psychic wastelands - cages, snares, dead ends. In 'All This Time', Christian hope is undercut: "Blessed are the poor, for they shall inherit the earth The effect at times is a bit overwhelming, but it's gripping, too - the tossing and turning of an anxious superman.

The timing couldn't have been better. Pro-rain forest activist and generally concerned rock star Sting has released his third solo album, The Soul Cages. For maximum environmental protection, the CD is packaged in a "digipack," a fold-over cardboard case designed as an alternative to the wasteful, tree-killing longbox. The records not only supplement each other perfectly; they also help answer one of the most vital questions ever considered by man.

Which is more irritating-mosquitoes or pompous rock stars The Soul Cages has little to do with rain forests or any subject as overtly global as Brazilian Rainforest. Like everything Sting has done since the Police established themselves as the most commercially successful of all power-pop bands, the album is intended as a serious artistic statement. Early word of mouth had it that the record would be a return to Sting's rock- oriented roots especially since he is playing bass, not guitar, for the first time since the Police's 'Synchronicity' in Blaring guitars probably wouldn't be appropriate anyway, since the songs are mostly a sullen bunch that explore personal and romantic loss and relationships gone astray, with the recent death of Sting's father casting a shadow over the proceedings.

In 'Island of Souls', a shipbuilder's son mourns the death of his dad from a work accident, while Sting's own loss is more directly expressed in 'All This Time' and the mournful 'Why Should I Cry for You' In comparison, the inevitable tract about world destruction, 'Jeremiah Blues Part 1 ', sounds like good news.

Somber themes, even those of an intimate bent, are nothing new for a Sting record. But rarely have songs about feeling awful sounded so stillborn and unmoving. The man was never as much of a sucker for a hook as Elton John was, but throughout 'The Soul Cages', Sting defiantly resists hummability as if a mere catchy pop chorus were too frivolous for such weighty content. Likewise, his latest band-a mix of jazz and rock veterans-seems to be taking its cue from its leader, a man incapable of leaving a simple thought alone.

Just when the group settles into a cozy groove on 'Jeremiah Blues Part 1 ' for instance, the mood is broken with a noodling piano break. At other times, the arrangements don't make sense: 'All This Time', which should be one of the record's most touching moments, is upbeat for no discernible reason. Review from The Baltimore Sun by J D Considine If making a successful rock and roll album was simply a matter of following a formula, Sting's new album, 'The Soul Cages', which was released yesterday, would be a recipe for disaster.

It isn't that the music is bad. Listen closely, though, and what Sting sings about is anything but typical hit-parade material. Offizielle Deutsche Charts in German. GfK Entertainment. Archived from the original on 29 November Retrieved 1 May Hit Parade Italia in Italian. Oricon Style. Archived from the original on 6 March Archived from the original on 2 December Archived from the original on 8 April Retrieved 6 May Archived from the original PHP on 23 October Archived from the original on 21 July Retrieved 6 May — via GeoCities.

Archived from the original on 24 December Archived from the original on 11 January Archived from the original on 6 December Australia's Music Charts IFPI Austria.

Theo Roos. Music Canada. Archived from the original on 25 December Bundesverband Musikindustrie. Retrieved 8 April — via American Radio History. Roppongi, Tokyo: Oricon Entertainment. Recording Industry Association of Japan. Solo Exitos — Ano A Ano. IFPI Switzerland. British Phonographic Industry. Select albums in the Format field.

Comment: Sting - Soul Cages - 12 Inch - UK Pressing - A&m - - AMY - 4 Track B/W Walking In Your Footsteps Live, Don't Stand So Close To Me Live and Oo La La Hugh Small Sticker Tear To Top Left Front Corner of Pic Sleeve - Condition (Sleeve/Disc): EX-/EX/5(73). Apr 16,  · Sting Live "The Soul Cages" Full Concert, recorded in 10 May , at The Hague, Netherlands. This was a benefit gig for Kurd Aid. The Kurds, still today, are a nation without a territory. Album · · 9 Songs. Available with an Apple Music subscription. Try it free. Radio Sign In The Soul Cages Sting Pop · Preview SONG TIME Island of Souls. 1. PREVIEW All This Time. 2. PREVIEW Mad About You. 3. Why Should I Cry for You? 5. PREVIEW Saint Agnes and the Burning Train. 6. PREVIEW The. Emboldened by the enthusiastic response to the muted Nothing Like the Sun and reeling from the loss of his parents, Sting constructed The Soul Cages as a hushed mediation on mortality, loss, grief, and father/son relationships (the album is dedicated, in part, to his father; its predecessor was dedicated to his mother). Using the same basic band as Nothing Like the Sun, the album 8/ Emboldened by the enthusiastic response to the muted Nothing Like the Sun and reeling from the loss of his parents, Sting constructed The Soul Cages as a hushed mediation on mortality, loss, grief, and father/son relationships (the album is dedicated, in part, to his father; its predecessor was dedicated to his mother). Using the same basic band as Nothing Like the Sun, the album Brand: A&M. "The Soul Cages" may be the biggest exception. Complaints that it's too gloomy are understandable, if you prefer poppy "Nothing Like the Sun" Sting, and especially if you're into silly "Ten Summoner's Tales" Sting, but for those that recognize he did his best work with the Police (and he did), it's clear that the gloom makes this album/5(4). Very Good: An item that is used but still in very good condition. No damage to the jewel case or item cover, no scuffs, scratches, cracks, or holes. The cover art and liner notes are included. The VHS or DVD box is included. The video game instructions and box are pegaternatheza.pingbeetvantgistvisanrerolabdiopase.co Rating: % positive. Nov 01,  · The Soul Cages is the third full-length studio album released by Sting and the first to feature longtime guitarist Dominic Miller. Released in , it became his second No. 1 album in the United /5(37). Dec 01,  · Song The Wild Wild Sea; Artist Sting; Licensed to YouTube by UMG (on behalf of A&M); LatinAutor, CMRRA, EMI Music Publishing, SOLAR Music Rights Management, UNIAO BRASILEIRA DE EDITORAS DE MUSICA - UBEM, LatinAutor - SonyATV, BMI - Broadcast Music Inc., and 3 Music Rights Societies. Sting, Dominic, Vinnie and David perform "The Soul Cages" at his 40th birthday party at the Hollywood Bowl on October 2,


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9 Replies to “ Why Should I Cry For You - Sting - The Soul Cages (Vinyl, LP, Album) ”

  1. Voodootaxe says: Reply
    View credits, reviews, tracks and shop for the Vinyl release of The Soul Cages on Discogs. Label: A&M Records - • Format: Vinyl LP, Album • Country: Venezuela • Genre: Jazz, Rock, Pop • Style: Blues Rock, Jazz-Rock, Soft Rock5/5.
  2. View credits, reviews, tracks and shop for the Digipak CD release of The Soul Cages on Discogs/5(52).
  3. Mazutaur says: Reply
    Reeling from the loss of his parents, Sting constructed The Soul Cages as a hushed mediation on mortality, loss, grief, and father/son relationships. The set is packaged in an exact replica of the original artwork, on gram heavyweight vinyl. The new vinyl master was cut at the legendary Abbey Road studios to ensure exceptional audio quality/5(74).
  4. Track List Island of Souls All This Time Mad About You Jeremiah Blues (Part 1) Why Should I Cry for You Saint Agnes and the Burning Train The Wild Wild Sea The Soul Cages When the Angels Fall Protection Each record is protected within its record sleeve by a white vellum anti-dust sleeve. Packaging All items are shipped brand-new and unopened in original packaging.
  5. Emboldened by the enthusiastic response to the muted Nothing Like the Sun and reeling from the loss of his parents, Sting constructed The Soul Cages as a hushed mediation on mortality, loss, grief, and father/son relationships (the album is dedicated, in part, to his father; its predecessor was dedicated to his mother). Using the same basic band as Nothing Like the Sun, the album 8/
  6. The title song is based on a fable about souls trapped under the sea in Davy Jones' locker and how a sailor wagers the king of the sea to free them. 'The Soul Cages' was an album of mourning. When you lose both your parents, your realise you're an orphan. Sadness is a good thing, too, to feel a loss so deeply.
  7. Gardataur says: Reply
    Sting, Dominic, Vinnie and David perform "The Soul Cages" at his 40th birthday party at the Hollywood Bowl on October 2,
  8. "The Soul Cages" may be the biggest exception. Complaints that it's too gloomy are understandable, if you prefer poppy "Nothing Like the Sun" Sting, and especially if you're into silly "Ten Summoner's Tales" Sting, but for those that recognize he did his best work with the Police (and he did), it's clear that the gloom makes this album/5(4).
  9. Apr 16,  · Sting Live "The Soul Cages" Full Concert, recorded in 10 May , at The Hague, Netherlands. This was a benefit gig for Kurd Aid. The Kurds, still today, are a nation without a territory.

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