Window - Genesis - From Genesis To Revelation (CD, Album) download full album zip cd mp3 vinyl flac

In Octoberafter the group had grown in popularity, it peaked at No. King retains the rights to the album which has been reissued multiple times since, including a release as In the Beginning and a release as And the Word Was A reissue in and included a bonus disc with extra tracks.

During the Easter school holiday the five entered a primitive recording studio run by Brian Roberts in Chiswick to record the material. He listened to the tape in his car on his drive home and, despite its roughness, was immediately enthusiastic, particularly to Gabriel's vocals.

He pressed for more simple arrangements, but maintained that his suggestion for the group to avoid playing electric instruments was because acoustic instruments were cheaper, rather than his personal taste. However, the group's parents expressed concern as they were aged between 15 and 17 at the time, and preferred their children to pursue careers away from music.

Upon their insistence for a one-year deal with an optional second, King agreed. King noticed the band's tendency to expand and complicate their arrangements, which he disliked and suggested they stick to straightforward pop songs. This culminated in King either trimming Banks's solo spots or removing them entirely, much to his annoyance.

Despite their lack of success King continued to support the group and, by mid, suggested that a studio album might reverse their fortunes. The group were a little overwhelmed in working with a greater amount of available time on an LP, so King suggested the idea of a loose concept album that told a story about the Book of Genesis at the start and the Book of Revelation at the end, Window - Genesis - From Genesis To Revelation (CD linked instrumental tracks.

In Augustduring the school summer holidays, the band returned to Regent Sound studio 2 to record From Genesis to Revelation. Phillips was particularly angered at the decision and was the only member to express his feelings towards it by stomping out of the studio on the last day. The album was released in March and failed to chart. Prior to its release, Decca discovered that an American act had also called themselves Genesis and asked the band to change its name to avoid confusion.

King reached a compromise so the band's name be omitted from the sleeve, leaving the album's title written in gold text in a Gothic style in order to evoke mystery when presented in music shops. The album sold copies. Noel Gallagher is a fan of the album, saying, "I became obsessed with early Genesis" despite being a frequent critic of the group's later work, particularly the Phil Collins -led era. When the album failed to become a success, the group decided to split and resume education.

Genesis began formulating the music that would be recorded on their next album, Trespass. Material that was put onto tape during this time but remained unreleased was included on the Genesis Archive —75 box set, in It's not a bad album. But even when you leave your mind used to epics Foxtrot and Selling and compare it independently with other prog folk releases of late 60's you know, still, the result is not so great. The problem here is annoying repeating here "We're waiting for you.

We need you with us. Come and join us now! And it's not problem of just this song, it's ever-present. Symphonic elements are nice, but more like solid background to tender music hey, we're talking about Genesis, right? So if you want acoustic Genesis without Genesis, that's a choice for you. You know, it's hard to depart from you were taught all your life I suppose that's true for most of you, readers. Piano, acoustic guitar, sometimes always chamber-like a capella voice of Peter Gabriel reminiscent of what will come later.

One could be forgiven for thinking this must be a great relic. After all, the first Yes album is dated but good and rocking, and the first Floyd album is a masterpiece. Certainly Genesis' debut had to be as great too?

Many proggers hunted down this collection hoping such logic would pay off, only to be disappointed to varying degrees. For the Genesis debut is nowhere near the otherworldly genius of Piper or the already formidable chops of Yes. The resulting music caught the ear of rising musical man Jonathan King who got the lads into the studio in the summer of Upon completion and apparently without permission King took the new material and layered it with strings and horns making what could have possessed more original personality into a finished product that sounded a bit commercial and ordinary.

Phillips was the most openly critical of what King saw as the chance to get the band viable: "Ah, the strings on "From Genesis to Revelation.

And I completely freaked out. I can only quote all my other friends saying 'He's butchered it. I think they work terribly well, actually. It gives the songs a sweetness that wasn't there in the original thing and covers up some of the slight amateurishness of the basic tracks. Gabriel's warm and soulful voice is already a showcase.

The acoustic guitars have a briskly strummed pace, controlled, with Ant peeling off a modest solo here or there. Tony has some lovely piano episodes. But the band's talents are certainly modest, as is the sound and production which are pretty weak, to be expected as this was recorded in about 3 days. I can see what excited King however as the songwriting shows some real potential. Especially cool is the fantasy vibe of "The Serpent" and the foreboding piano lines of "Am I Very Wrong" which also sports Gabriel's flute playing.

Tony plays a minute long piano solo to introduce "Fireside Song" which is rather somber and yet hopeful, quite lovely. Other tracks sport short piano ballads with a bit of folk influence, a dramatic young Gabriel, some "la la" backing vocals, occasionally a bit of light rock and soul. But these short tracks never develop to the point of any interesting instrumental jamming that would become commonplace later.

But the overall performance and sound are fairly weak and there are some duds as well. I enjoy this music quite a lot despite the strikes against it. What a leap they would take on the next album! Because of this album, I placed "early Genesis" on the backburner for years. So I hope you will forgive me if I don't allow the band's subsequent works to award bonus or concession points to "From Genesis to Revelation".

Here is how it happened. Because I was only familiar with the commercial Genesis music of the s, everyone kept telling me "You simply must check out early Genesis".

I finally acquiesced when one day at the record store I saw a copy of the album "From Genesis to Revelation". Upon placing the needle on the LP, I couldn't believe my ears. This was what everyone was ranting and raving about??? It sounded like folk era Bee Gees. Well it sounded more like somewhat 'watered down' folk era Bee Gees to be brutally honest.

Early Bee Gees music was actually quite professional produced folk-pop. This was somewhat amateurish in comparison. I incredulously double-checked the album cover to see if perhaps I had purchased an album by some local band that also had used the name Genesis.

This was "the" real Genesis of old. I immediately filed "early Genesis" into the "not for me" category. I present this esperience as a "case study" to illustrate what I believe you really already know deep within your "heart of hearts". That - musically speaking - prog fans would not pursue and purchase this record were it not for their interest in Genesis based upon their subsequent output.

Later, once the age of internet radio brought a wider range of "try before you buy" prog music to my ears, I was provided the opportunity to hear 70's era Genesis and to hear the difference! And what a difference it is! But, had my exposure to "early Genesis" been left to the content of this album, I would never have sought out to learn or hear more. That doesn't make this album worthless, however. This record is of interest from the perspective of early band history. And even were it not for prog music history's sake, fans and collectors of Genesis would still want to hear this debut because of how it, by way of contrast, makes the impact of the band's follow up albums all the more powerful.

But let's not kid ourselves. It is a 2 star album by a band that Window - Genesis - From Genesis To Revelation (CD soon shake the progressive rock world with a dramatic quantum leap forward on their very next album. I've no idea how many times this thing has been reissued. I know I looked this up though and found at least 25 of them.

Mine is a vinyl release called 'Rock Roots 1', released by Decca UK in with liner notes that indicate the label clearly felt the band was on its way out after Gabriel's departure. With downloads and on-line ordering and multi-national global corporations being all the norm today it's easy to forget the days when an imported album was kind of a big deal, back when British imports generally had thinner sleeves and thicker vinyl than American releases. I've no idea why this thing would have been imported to the U.

The thing would have cost more back then than most new albums considering the import tariffs, and since Genesis weren't exactly a household name in the U.

The cover is pretty cheesy: a heavily color-treated photo of an old Decca Stereogram 33rpm singles record player superimposed with a couple press photos of the band, the same photos used on the covers of several later reissues including the Dutch Black Box 2-disc CD set that was issued just a few years ago.

Well thanks to time and the band's fame after this record released, these songs are pretty familiar to most progressive music fans today. Certainly much has been said of the spotty production and over-the-top string and horn arrangements on most every track, although from my perspective these aren't as distracting as most hardcore fans of the band seem to find them and frankly they probably help spruce up what would have been rather sterile- sounding songs otherwise.

Gabriel's lyrics are much better than his vocals, which are simply average here but would blossom into the stuff of legends within a couple years of this release. On a view tracks the dates sound of the melodies and instrument-playing are quite strong, particularly "In Limbo", "A Place to Call My Own" and "A Winter's Tale", but elsewhere the songs stand up as pretty decent precursors of what would come later.

In keeping with the times and the post-psych commercial leanings of British labels of the late sixties, these are all short tracks with fairly accessible arrangements, certainly a far cry from 'The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway' but decent enough if compared to their contemporaries rather than to their later catalog.

There are also a couple of pre-album singles on this release including their B-sidesbut none of this is new to anyone who has picked up any of a number of later CD reissues. Like I said, I'm not exactly a Genesis fan but when I play this record today and consider it solely on its own merits, it's not a bad record.

Certainly not a masterpiece, and not even as good as another Genesis band U. But good enough to rate three stars on a scale of five, which is what I'm going to give it right now. There, I finally got around to assessing this one and can slip it back into it's vinyl sleeve and stick it back in the stacks for another few years. Perhaps my kids or grandkids will rediscover it and help perpetuate the myth that is Genesis for yet another generation someday.

One never knows?. The album's lyrics is another contentious issue for me, and I'm sorry but I can't make allowances for the band member's tender years. That's fine, but on other songs some of the lyrics are mawkish and downright face flush material. The Musical Box it ain't, although there was maybe the germ of an idea among those words. I'm probably being unfair with this criticism, but hey-ho.

It's not all bad news though and there are a few vague signs of the band's early potential, with some interesting little musical fragments and links between songs.

I don't want to damn this recording with faint praise, but many of the songs are just nice. This album is important in the history of Genesis but not in the history of Prog.

It's definitely one for fans only. To be honest, if you're in the mood for some late '60s psychedelic pop you'd be better listening to Best Of The Bee Gees Volume So the obvious question comes to mind - WHY am I giving this album a 4-star rating??!!!

Because beneath all of the superficial weaknesses lie two of Genesis' strengths, in just as full of force now as they would be later - incredible songwriting and incredible vocals from Peter. I don't know if I'm just listening to different songs than the rest of y'all, but almost a dozen of the songs on here and yes, I'm counting the singles on the reissue, more on those later are, Window - Genesis - From Genesis To Revelation (CD, at least in one aspect in each of them, absolute pop perfection.

And the rest Are you going to tell me that the chorus of that song isn't one of the most perfectly constructed tunes you've ever heard??!!

And don't forget "In Hiding" or "Window," no sirree, the former with another perfect sing-songey melody and the latter yet another beautiful ballad.

And that sure as heck isn't all. Guaranteed to please is right, dang it. And neither "The Conqueror" nor "One Day" fall short of the standard, the former a great energetic rocker and the latter one of the most perfect love songs I've ever heard. Oh, and don't forget the bonus tracks. The single version of "The Silent Sun" is only slightly better than the album one and that one's really dull, actuallybut the other three are all highly recommendable.

Oh, I was going to tell you about Peter's vocals on this album, wasn't I. Now, at first glance, it would seem that Peter fails miserably in trying to vocalize the early chapters of Genesis, the logic being that since he's singing about such a profound part of Christianity, he should sound booming and authoritative to match the profundity. Well, quite honestly, I think that's bunk. How do you really think Adam would have been upon his placement on the earth - authoritative and patriarchal, ready to assume his place as the biological father of all of Man?

He would have been filled with wide-eyed awe at all of the creations around him - his own body, the animals in the garden, not to mention Eve and this new, strange emotion called 'love'. The lyrics which, btw, are NOT bad - they are youthful and naive in their feel, but naive does not necessarily mean bad or sloppy and vocals on this album combine in such a way as to perfectly convey the 'story behind the story' with Adam. In case you haven't been able to tell, I really like this album.

If you dislike it, well, it's your own choice, but dismissing it so easily just based on the lack of competent instrumentation and stupid orchestration seems no less than a fatal mistake to me. The former has some great feedback at the beginning, while the latter has the only good use of orchestra on the album. At the end of "Fireside Song" you can hear a preview of "Twilight Alehouse".

It may be a bonus track but it's the best thing on the whole CD. This is only for people who want everything Genesis did. This is the worst studio album they ever did. The work of amateurs with no sense of direction. Awful production to boot. This honestly does not deserve anything more than 1 star.

As a lover of pop music that is not what bothers me with this release. The fact that Peter Gabriel, Banks, Phillips, Rutherfield and Silver would go on to anything great totally eludes the listener at this point.

I mean even in the world of pop music of this is weak! The melodies aren't melodic enough. The symphonics aren't symphonic enough. Everything just seems like amateur hour. And so it is here. It's obvious why this one wants to be forgotten and I am in the camp where I find this extremely boring despite my eclectic nature but there is little on here to warrant interest other than the historical interpretation of a famous band and their origins.

There really is no standout track and although I have tried to find some redeeming value in this, I utterly fail every time. In the case of GENESIS I can only recommend totally skipping this debut and heading to the second release "Trespass" which is hard to believe that it is performed by the same band.

If you want symphonic prog from the 60s, skip this and head straight to the Moody Blues. It was produced by Jonathan King, who discovered them in while they were pupils at the Charterhouse School. Despite be their first work, in some Genesis' catalogs, this debut album doesn't appear as part of the official group's discography.

When their demo tapes caught the attention of King, with the addition of Chris Stewart on drums a schoolmate of them, they recorded their first single 'The Silent Sun'. All songs were written by Gabriel, Phillips, Banks and Rutherford. The first track 'Where The Sour Turns To Sweet' is a very interesting song and, in my humble opinion, is one of Album) best and one of the few really good songs on the album.

We can even say that this song has the seeds of what will be the future of their musical sound. The second track 'In The Beginning' isn't really a bad track. It's a nice rock song with some interesting musical parts. However, the sound quality of the song is a little bit poor and the developing of the song isn't particularly brilliant. The third track 'Fireside Song' represents also, in my humble opinion, one of the best musical moments on the album.

It's a very beautiful song, very pleasant and nice to listen to. I particularly like the piano parts and the acoustic passages. Even the orchestra sounds beautifully on the song. The fourth track 'The Serpent' starts quiet and very well, with its bass line, good drumming and beautiful acoustic parts. However, it sounds too much to the 60's and makes me remember strongly The Beatles and The Doors.

It's not a bad song but I can't see anything special on it. The fifth track 'Am I Very Wrong? It's a very good song with beautiful musical passages. The piano parts are great and very pretty to listen to, and they can move with me. This song has also one of the best vocal performances on the album and shows the real skills of Gabriel as a singer.

The sixth track 'In The Wilderness' represents also, for me, another highlight on the album. This is a very beautiful song with excellent orchestration. The strings parts and the piano solo are very nice and bring to the song a very special touch. It's also a song with a brilliant vocal performance by Gabriel. The seventh track 'The Conqueror' is a song that opens with a guitar repeating the main theme of 'In The Wilderness'.

It has some nice acoustic and piano parts but the harmony isn't particularly brilliant. In reality, this is a weak song, a little bit repetitive, and with nothing special on it. The eighth track 'In Hiding' is another weak song. Unfortunately, it has the same problems of the most of the songs on the album. It's also a repetitive song and where the theme doesn't develop very well.

The Gabriel's voice sounds nice, but the rest of the song doesn't deserve more attention. This is a very nice song where all the musical instruments are performed nicely, and especially the piano and the bass parts are very good. The tenth track 'Window' is unfortunately another non memorable song. It has some interesting musical parts like the acoustic and piano parts, which are very pleasant to listen to, but only that is interesting.

The rest of the song isn't also particularly brilliant. The eleventh track 'In Limbo' is another perfectly vulgar song, without any musical idea and that sounds too much to the 60's. It's another song with anything special on it. This is probably my less favourite song on the album. The twelfth track 'Silent Sun', as I wrote above, was released as the debut single of the band.

So, we can say that it represents the beginning of all. Musically, we can say that it's a fusion between folk and pop rock with the heavy use of orchestral strings. Personally, I must confess that I like particularly of this song and it represents, for me, another highlight on the album. It isn't also, in my humble opinion, a brilliant song.

However, it has very nice performances by Gabriel and Banks, which shows their real musical talents. Conclusion: I'm a big Genesis fan, and for me, Genesis is one of the best progressive bands ever, and is also my favourite progressive band too. The problem of this album is that it sounds like more an album of the 60's, and its music has more in common with the Moody Blues and the early Bee Gees, than the future sound of Genesis as a progressive group, especially if we compare it with their second studio album 'Trespass', released only one year later.

So, despite this debut be not properly a bad album, it has nothing to do with the great and influential prog band as Genesis are. Prog is my Ferrari. There are some dark moments, some weird moments, some good melodies and some mediocre moments, but overall the album gels together well enough. It is more of a curio for those who wish to delve into the early years of the band.

A nice piece of archival music for the connoisseur but little else. As a massive Genesis fanatic it was inevitable I would get around to this album, which is marginally better than the troubled 80s era, but it has no chance against the 70s albums of Genesis that are simply masterpieces. I can't really justify giving this album more than the absolute minimum rating for a very simple reason: it's a misrepresentation of who Genesis were even at this very early point in their development, let alone being Album) far short of the standards they would later attain.

As mentioned, the orchestration on this was imposed by King without the band being informed or involved, and as such doesn't reflect their musical intentions in the slightest; at its worst, it completely smothers what they were going for.

The Genesis Archive boxed set includes some of the demo tracks without the orchestra, which is far more interesting to anyone interested in exploring their pre-Trespass sound, but I can't imagine anyone putting those on regular rotation.

As for this set of songs, it's some rather rudimentary psych-folk vandalised with the excessive strings.

The overall effect is like going to a folk concert except an orchestra is rehearsing next door and the soundproofing really isn't up to scratch. Release Info Studio Recording. Track Listing. Where the Sour Turns to Sweet. In the Beginning. Fireside Song. Am I Very Wromg.

In the Wilderness. In Hiding. One Day. In Limbo. Silent Sun. Place to Call My Own. Winter's Tale.

From Genesis to Revelation is the first studio album by the British progressive rock band Genesis. It was released in March on Decca Records in England. GENESIS self titled Genesis g LP (Half Speed Mastering) New Sealed Vinyl 5 out of 5 stars (1) 1 product ratings - GENESIS self titled Genesis g LP (Half Speed Mastering) New Sealed Vinyl. From Genesis to Revelation is a music studio album recording by GENESIS (Symphonic Prog/Progressive Rock) released in on cd, lp / vinyl and/or cassette. This page includes From Genesis to Revelation's: cover picture, songs / tracks list, members/musicians and line-up, different releases details, free MP3 download (stream), buy online links: amazon, ratings and detailled reviews /5(). Das CD-Album "From Genesis To Revelation" von Genesis () - Alle Infos, Songs und mehr. This debut Genesis album, which has appeared under license to various labels in addition to Decca and London in different configurations, is largely of historical interest. The group was still in its formative stages, the members barely past their 18th birthdays and still working out what they wanted to sound like. Initially released on Decca Records in UK, "From Genesis to Revelation" has since been licensed to many smaller labels, who often issue it with different artwork and/or different titles. First release in U.S. on London Records, View credits, reviews, tracks and shop for the CD release of From Genesis To Revelation on Discogs. Label: Music Club - MCCD • Format: CD Album, Reissue • Country: UK • Genre: Rock, Pop • Style: Psychedelic Rock, Pop Rock3/5(1). View credits, reviews, tracks and shop for the CD release of From Genesis To Revelation on Discogs. Label: Edsel Records - MEDCD • Format: CD Album, Reissue, Stereo CD Compilation, Mono All Media Deluxe Edition • Country: UK & Europe • Genre: Rock, Pop • /5(23). From Genesis to Revelation is the end result of the collaboration between the young men from Charterhouse College in Surrey and record producer Jonathan King. Peter Gabriel, Tony Banks, Mike Rutherford and Anthony Phillips were sending demos to King, which included the Bee Gee-ish "Silent Sun," in the hopes that he could advance their careers/5(8). In definitiva, forse, From Genesis to Revelation sarà apprezzato maggiormente da coloro che non amano particolarmente, o non ascoltano abitualmente il progressive: addirittura da coloro che lo ignorano pegaternatheza.pingbeetvantgistvisanrerolabdiopase.coione da pegaternatheza.pingbeetvantgistvisanrerolabdiopase.co[::Dati Tecnici::]lossless FLACartwork incluso[::Note::]In seed tra le e le ad almeno 30 kb/s.


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9 Replies to “ Window - Genesis - From Genesis To Revelation (CD, Album) ”

  1. View credits, reviews, tracks and shop for the CD release of From Genesis To Revelation on Discogs. Label: Edsel Records - MEDCD • Format: CD Album, Reissue, Stereo CD Compilation, Mono All Media Deluxe Edition • Country: UK & Europe • Genre: Rock, Pop • /5(23).
  2. View credits, reviews, tracks and shop for the CD release of From Genesis To Revelation on Discogs. Label: Music Club - MCCD • Format: CD Album, Reissue • Country: UK • Genre: Rock, Pop • Style: Psychedelic Rock, Pop Rock3/5(1).
  3. Sep 25,  · Genesis has 4 distinct eras. "From Genesis to Revelation" is the first era all by itself. The other 3 are the Gabriel era, the Collins era, and the Post-Collins era (i.e., Calling All Stations). Although "From Genesis to Revelation" featured Gabriel as lead vocalist, it has a very distinctive sound from the rest of the Gabriel Genesis albums/5().
  4. Original album released by Decca, March Recorded at Regent Sound 2, Denmark Street, London, Summer Tracks 1 & 2 and 16 & 17 are from the first two Genesis singles. Members of Genesis for this first album: Peter Gabriel, Mike Rutherford, Tony /5(21).
  5. After a couple of singles were released, Stewart was replaced with John Silver, and the result is the record known as "From Genesis To Revelation." It's too bad the record was so poorly received, selling less than copies in the U.K., but this was largely due to poor marketing/5(24).
  6. Meshicage says: Reply
    Genesis has 4 distinct eras. "From Genesis to Revelation" is the first era all by itself. The other 3 are the Gabriel era, the Collins era, and the Post-Collins era (i.e., Calling All Stations). Although "From Genesis to Revelation" featured Gabriel as lead vocalist, it has a very distinctive sound from the rest of the Gabriel Genesis albums/5().
  7. This debut Genesis album, which has appeared under license to various labels in addition to Decca and London in different configurations, is largely of historical interest. The group was still in its formative stages, the members barely past their 18th birthdays and still working out what they wanted to sound like.
  8. Arashijinn says: Reply
    Initially released on Decca Records in UK, "From Genesis to Revelation" has since been licensed to many smaller labels, who often issue it with different artwork and/or different titles. First release in U.S. on London Records,
  9. Genesis - From Genesis To Revelation: Tracklist (Vinyl) A1: Where The Sour Turns To Sweet: A2: In The Beginning: A3: Fireside Song: A4: The Serpent: A5: Am I Very Wrong: A6: In The Wilderness: B1: The Conqueror: See more tracks * Items below may differ depending on the release.

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